Duke Energy's Toxic Ash Spill

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NORTH CAROLINA-- Researching the toxic ash spill, I came across an interesting and very informative article at newsobserver.com.

 

I was born in Scranton, Pa. which was a coal mining town. My grandmother lost her father and stepfather both to the coal mines in Scranton. There certainly was a time when coal was needed as an energy source in the United States.

However, today there are so many options available, cleaner to use and not having the same possible devasting environmental damage to the environment. A strong example is a recent toxic ash spill that has harmed the Dan River, the nation's third largest ash spill, estimated to be up to 39,000 tons of ash . (broken pipe found Feb 2, 2014)

The plant that is no longer even working, is where a Duke security guard found a broken stormwater pipe. Duke tried for five days to stop the damaging spill.

Feb 2015: A year later, Duke's North Carolina ash ponds appear to still be leaking. It's estimated that more than 3 million gallons a day near rivers and lakes. In December 2014, Duke reported 200 seeps at its 14 coal-fired power plants. Duke also said it wasn't clear if all of them come from ash ponds.

March 2015: Duke Energy was fined $25 Million Dollars by the Environment and Natural Resources for coal ash problems.

March 2015: Duke Energy files for permits with North Carolina Environment and Natural Resources that the leaks be allowed to continue. That discharges continue from "12 potentially contaminated ground water seeps" near Mountain Island Lake, which supplies drinking water to the city of Charlotte.

Duke Energy plans to start moving the ash 60 days after the permits are approved.

*Duke Energy has agreed to a plan that gives them until the year 2029 to clean up all 14 coal ash ponds.

*source: newsobserver.com

 article by Bruce Henderson

 

 

 

 

 

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